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Jacksonville Warrants Attorney


A warrant gives law enforcement authorization to perform a certain act that a judge has found to be supported by probable cause. There are a few different types of warrants, each of which has its own set of requirements that must be met to be found lawful.


Automobile Accident

Record $2.6 Million Jury Verdict against Volusia County. Our trial televised on Good Morning America.

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Wrongful Death

Represented the family of Jordan Davis and assisted with criminal prosecution of Jordan's killer, handled media relations of internationally reported case and obtained confidential civil settlement

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Medical Malpractice

Confidential settlement of over 120 cases against a pediatric dentist who was also prosecuted. We also assisted with shutting his dental practice down. He no longer practices dentistry.

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RSD / CRPS Verdict

Obtained verdict in Jacksonville, Florida of over $900,000 and added attorneys fees of over $250,000 on a case State Farm only offered approximately $30,000 for years.

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$1.1 Million Verdict Against Coca-Cola

We obtained an over $1 million verdict against Coca-Cola in moderate impact soft tissue damages case in Gainesville, Florida.

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Brain Injury Medical Malpractice

Phillips obtained a confidential settlement against a chiropractor who provided prescription pain medication to a boxer in advance of an Olympic qualifying fight. She sustained a brain injury due to secondary impact syndrome.

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Search Warrants

A search warrant provides law enforcement authorization to search a particular person, place, or thing. These warrants are issued by a judge after reviewing an application submitted by law enforcement which contains one or more sworn statements being offered to establish the probable cause necessary to search as requested. In order to protect a person’s Fourth Amendment right against unreasonable searches and seizures, Florida law requires search warrants meet certain legal requirements. Such requirements include that the warrant name or describe the person, place, or thing to be searched and that it particularly describe the property or thing to be seized. These requirements, among others, provide the individual whose person or property is being searched notice as to the permissible limits of the search in order to protect his or her constitutional rights. Search warrants must meet the minimum legal requirements for any evidence seized to be admissible against those who had an expectation of privacy in the area searched.

Arrest Warrants

Arrest warrants, like search warrants, are issued by a judge upon reviewing sworn statements of law enforcement which are offered to show probable cause exists to arrest a particular person. Also like search warrants, arrest warrants must meet minimum legal requirements for the actions of law enforcement to be upheld in a court of law.

Our Own Investigation

In addition to challenging these warrants after they are executed, a criminal defense lawyer can help during the initial investigation by speaking with law enforcement regarding their investigation and conducting his or her own investigation of the facts and witnesses. Of course, the goal of this proactive approach is to avoid formal arrest or charges from occurring at all. However, should an arrest become imminent, it may be coordinated with law enforcement to take place at a time and location that will eliminate the embarrassment and inconvenience that accompanies an arrest in public or in front of friends and family. Further arrangements may also be made to streamline the arrest and booking process such as coordinating with a local bondsman to post bond immediately, allowing the arrested to get back home to take care of family and employment responsibilities as soon as possible.

Bench Warrants

A final type of warrant is called a bench warrant, or capias, which is issued by a judge when a defendant fails to appear for a required court hearing. Put simply, judges do not take these failures to appear lightly. Unlike a typical arrest warrant, a capias may be withdrawn by the issuing judge under most circumstances, but must be handled appropriately.

If you have been the subject of a search warrant, or fear there may be a warrant for your arrest, do not hesitate to contact the Law Office of John M. Phillips for a free consultation to discuss your situation and how we can help.


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